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MARIUS COURCOUL wearing the Gio gilet no.001. He is a law student living in Paris, France.

Who is an inspirational figure?
Christiane Taubira.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
The Way You Make Me Feel – Michael Jackson.

What should we be reading?
“Une vie” by Simone Veil. Just because this woman was an incredible feminist.

What do you still wish to learn?
To play the piano.

What do you find humorous?
Guillaume Meurice on “France Inter” (it’s the best radio in France haha!)

What is still a mystery?
Interpersonal relationship.

What is good design?
When it’s simple, friendly, creative and not an overload.

Where do you find good design?
In a few second hand shops.

What does progression mean to you?
Challenge.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Tolerance.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
“Do not cross a red light, even if it’s 3am and no car is coming!”

What is your favorite word in any language?
Genau!

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
The Game Boy.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
Diversity.

What was your last download?
Channel Tres – Weedman.

What thoughts occupy you currently?
How should I dress today?

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
Elektra by Richard Strauss. It’s an opera from the beginning of the 20th century.

What is your favourite representation of simplicity?
A smile.

What is your favourite representation of complexity?
Shoelaces.

Where is happiness found?
Happiness can be found at a dinner and a party with my best friends

What was the last thing you photographed?
2 friends walking on the street.

What do you see outside your window?
Trees and parisian balconies.

What music makes you feel nostalgic?
Oh Woman Oh Man – London Grammar.

What stands the test of time?
A tale.

What are you working on at the moment?
I am reading my notes from my lesson in intellectual property before I begin university again.
 


SASHA SPIELBERG wearing the Romy cardigan no.003. She is a musician under the name Buzzy Lee living in Los Angeles, California.

Who is an inspirational figure?
Kate Bush, Taryn Simon, my grandma Lee, Michaela Coel, Donna Tartt, Alice Coltrane, all of my friends, my parents, my boyfriend.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Never to lie when swearing on one’s life.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
It used to be listening to music during take off, but now they allow it so: parking in a 2 hour zone longer than two hours.

What should we be reading?
Insomniac City by Bill Hayes. It’s a love story, it’s nostalgic, it’s escapist in a sense.

What takes you to cloud 9?
Playing live, matcha, a new perfume, guttural laughing, falling in love

What is good design?
Recliner chairs

Where do you find good design?
Crossword puzzles.

What does your house smell like?
Green tea, bergamot and cedar wood

What does your house sound like?
Wind chimes, distant far away cars driving 40 mph, an occasional train, many coyotes, me singing a lot.

What does progression mean to you?
Chords.

What thoughts occupy you currently?
Is the Zoloft working?

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
The book “Where Did I Come From”.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Flip phones.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
Access to discovering the undiscoverable.

What do you still wish to learn?
Coding.

What is your favourite representation of simplicity?
Corners.

What is your favourite representation of complexity?
Perfume: base notes and top notes.

Where is happiness found?
In an embrace.

What do you see outside your window?
Many a tree.

What do you find humorous?
Earnestness proceeded by a slapstick fall, the things people do with their hands when they are uncomfortable.
 


MARGHERITA MACCAPANI MISSONI wearing the Rosa cardigan no.001. She is the Creative Director of M Missoni living in Varese, Italy.

What do you see outside your window?
Lake Varese and Monte Rosa.

What music makes you feel nostalgic?
Lucio Battisti.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
È l’eccezione che conferma la regola.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
To have to walk around clothed.

Who is an inspirational figure?
Tina Modotti.

What is good design?
Beauty responding to needs.

Where do you find good design?
Fuorisalone, Flea Markets, Instagram.

What should we be reading?
Sapiens: a brief history of humankind by Yuval Noah Harari, and Malalai by Ortensia Visconti.

What does your house smell like?
Diptyque Baies.

What does your house sound like?
Currently Otto holds the remote and plays tacky italian trap music.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Margherita by Riccardo Cocciante.

What does progression mean to you?
Being in touch with one’s inner person and responding to our true needs, which evolve through time. The saddest thing is witnessing people being stuck in a period of their life.

What is your perfect meal?
A mix of raw and cooked veggies from the garden, uni sushi, superior quality gelato.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Readiness to make efforts.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
The melting pot.

What do you collect?
Daisies, fish, fake flowers, headpieces.

What was your last download?
Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
Memorie d'una ragazza perbene by Simone de Beauvoir.

What do you still wish to learn?
Mandarin, and driving with gears.

What is still a mystery?
The human brain.

What is a representation of simplicity?
A Greek island.

What is a representation of complexity?
Cancer.

What thoughts currently occupy you?
How to evolve the nanny situation in our life, kids are outgrowing the current set up.

What is your favorite slogan?
Shall we?

Can you define the words ‘timeless’ and ‘contemporary’?
Timeless- eternally fresh, Contemporary- suddenly fresh.

Any last words?
Leorosa Fan Club founding member ♥️
 


BARBARA SUKOWA wearing the Rosa cardigan no.007. She is an actress living in Brooklyn, New York.

Who are some of your inspirations...writer, artist, politician, director, actor?
Observing my cats has inspired me more than any artist.

What is your favorite word in any language?
The Swiss word for curious is “wunderfitzig”.

What do you find humorous?
That I still believe the world is changing all the time for the better.

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
The first piece that really touched me was the sleigh of Joseph Beuys that I saw as a young girl at the National Gallery in Berlin.

What should we be reading?
Reading should not be a “should”. If you go to the bookstore and a book spine sticks out at you check it out !

What do you collect?
Nothing.

The best arthouse film(s)?
Too many to choose from.

What do you still wish to learn?
To shut my mouth when it can get me in trouble.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Never say never.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
One that you really, despite trying hard, don’t understand.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
My breath.

What is a representation of simplicity?
Love

What is a representation of complexity?
Love

What stands the test of time?
Nothing

What is your favorite slogan?
Just do it.

What makes you feel nostalgic?
Looking at children’s photos of my grown up children.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood?
Oldest neighborhood association in the nation.

What does your house smell like?
As a German I have that obsession with fresh air and so the windows are always open and it smells like the outside. Sometimes flowers, sometimes rain, and sometimes weed.

What does your house sound like?
Mostly silent and the noise comes from outside. My neighbor has chickens, kids who play on the street. Couples arguing or laughing.

What is still a mystery?
The human mind.
 


GIGI ETTEDGUI wearing the Romy cardigan no.002. She is a Creative Assistant at Hermès, living in Paris, France.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood?
Café de Flore

Can you share some daily habits or rituals?
My morning breakfast at Café de Flore - noisette, tartine, cigarette and a couple of pages of whatever I am reading before walking across the Tuileries gardens in Paris to work

Who is an inspirational figure?
Lorenzo de’ Medici.

What should we be reading?
The Return of Martin Guerre by Natalie Zemon Davis. A fascinating and magical jump through time and across humanity into the early modern mind. Over four centuries old, a thrilling account of how and why someone could step into another man’s shoes...there is also a pretty wonderful film with Gerard Depardieu...

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Sarà perché ti amo.

What is good design?
Yakumo Saryō In Tokyo might be the most magically designed place I have been lucky enough to visit.

Where do you find good design?
At your fingertips.

What does your house smell like?
On Sunday nights it smells of incense, cigarettes, and roast chicken...

What does your house sound like?
And it rings with laughter.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Be Kind.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
Please do not take photos of the paintings.

What is your perfect meal?
Freshly shaved fennel carpaccio with lots of lemon and Parmesan. Bistecca Fiorentina with gratin dauphinois. Fondant au Chocolat. Washed down with a Montalcino wine.

What is your favorite word in any language?
Buonasera.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Holding onto the present.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
Its energy.

What do you collect?
Friends.

The best arthouse film?
The Wedding Banquet directed by Ang Lee.

What thoughts occupy you currently?
Dreams of Greek islands and Italian cities.

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
The idea of Lord Byron rowing into the Pantheon when the Tiber flooded and composing part of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage under the moonlit oculus.

What is a representation of simplicity?
A smile. A man’s shirt. A beautiful cardigan...

What is a representation of complexity?
Shyness.

What do you see outside your window?
A tree.

What is still a mystery?
Almost everything...

What makes you feel nostalgic?
Holiday photos of my heroes.

What stands the test of time?
Love.

What are you working on at the moment?
It’s a surprise!

Any last words?
Thank you!
 


ADRIÁN PRIETO wearing the Leo cardigan no.001. He is an architectural historian living in Vienna, Austria.

What takes you to cloud 9?
The experience of architecture is one of my main motivations to travel and to explore different countries and cities. I love visiting buildings that I am able to touch.

Is there an architect or building that you feel a particular admiration for?
I feel enormous admiration for many architects and buildings, from Palladio to Herman Czech. I especially admire the architects who are able to explore the emotional and symbolic realm. I think some Scandinavian architects such as Gunnar Asplund and Lewerentz or Viennese architects like Josef Frank and Oskar Strnad are good examples of this.

What is good design?
The result of priorities that have been correctly executed. The black watch by the Swiss brand Swatch is good design and what comes to mind. My grandmother, my mother and I all have or still wear one…there is something completely universal about it. A Patek Philippe might ease status anxiety, but a black swatch does and has everything you need.

Where do you find good design?
You can find good and bad design everywhere. Our life is conditioned by it in all sort of ways, from urban planning to every object in your house. I find it beautiful to realize something ordinary is ‘good design’. For example, the Oil Cruet, by Rafael Marquina from 1961 - the simplicity is apparent yet also provides functionality by preventing any oil drippings while using it, just brilliant. Apparently, it is one of the most copied objects, and yet only the original has the perfect proportions to make it stable and resistant.

Who do you find to be an iconic person?
Today we use the word ‘iconic’ for all sorts of things, from a building to a dessert. I don’t exactly know how it applies to a person but I would say Susan Sontag is sort of iconic. I am currently reading her biography by Benjamin Moser. Although, I still find her collection of diaries is where you experience her conscious, complex, and brilliant mind.

What should we be reading?
Coming back to Susan Sontag I would say the first volume of her diaries, Reborn, edited by her son. And Marcel Proust, Ha!

What does your house smell like?
I don’t use scents for the house. I like the feeling of fresh air and keeping the windows open. Houses have their own smells, materiality, and people living in them. Covering those smells seems unnecessary. I particularly enjoy the smell of coffee in the morning, many days I just prepare a cup for a ritualistic pleasure and the smell.

What does your house sound like?
Radio in the early morning. I enjoy listening to ‘France Culture’ during breakfast, it brings a sense of productivity. Otherwise total silence or the dishwasher.

What is dear to your heart?
My family and friends. Some beautiful memories.

What does progression mean to you?
In 2016 I visited the exhibition of Tino Sehgal at Palais de Tokyo, a group of different performers guided you through the entire space. One performer approached me and asked the exact same question. I replied, “it means nothing to me”. Honestly I don’t think progression is necessarily anything positive. It can mean we are alive and still moving, something I am glad for.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Always trust your intuition.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
No more candy for today!

What is your favorite word in any language?
"Extrañamiento" from the verb "extrañar" which has many nuances and meanings. This word often resonates in my work and life.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Ideals. Truth.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
I am intrigued by the way we use and react to digital images. It is exciting to see how digital archives are changing the course of research and providing us access to a database of material. However this access also can introduce a lack of understanding that could be a problem in contemporary culture.

The best arthouse film?
“Inside Rooms: 26 Bathrooms, London & Oxfordshire, 1985” directed by Peter Greenaway. We should not forget that it isn’t about fancy bathrooms or noble materials. It’s about the importance of claiming the bathroom as one's own-living space.

What is the most enigmatic work you have seen?
I was particularly struck some years ago in Paris by Lucinda Child’s dance company. I don't know much about dance and postmodern dance, but the materials she used to design the choreography, resulted in something beautiful and moving.

What do you still wish to learn?
Many things. I wanna learn to race a car.

What do you find humorous?
Frasier.

Who is an inspirational figure?
I keep the writings of the Spanish Art Historian, Ángel González García close to my heart. His poetic work has been an enormous inspiration. His book, “El Resto, Una Historia Invisible del Arte Contemporáneo” is always by my side. Read, “La meditación de los cactus”(cactus meditation), written on the use of cactus plants in modern expressionist and bauhaus interiors.

If you were interviewing a fellow historian, what would you ask them?
I would ask for their personal experiences and anecdotes. I love a good story.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Vienna is probably one of the most beautiful European cities. Beyond the surface you can discover an atmosphere that is truly magical. It is a hidden treasure of the East. I won’t say any in particular, people and tourists ruin everything.

What are you working on at the moment?
The quarantine has been a balsamic time for writing and reflecting for me. I am correcting my Ph.D thesis and preparing myself for the next move.

Any last words?
Thank you.
 


GILLES KHOURY wearing the Gio gilet no.002. He is a writer and journalist living in Beirut, Lebanon.

What does progression mean to you?
Not to worry about the notion of ‘normality’ anymore.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Some silence.

What is most exciting in contemporary culture?
The anger everywhere.

What thoughts currently occupy you?
What I’m going to have for my next meal. That’s because I want to distract myself from what is really worrying me: the future of my country Lebanon.

What should we be reading?
A book: Dans ma chambre by Guillaume Dustan (1996). A poem: En Montagne Libanaise by Nadia Tueni (1979). An Op-Ed: Désormais on se lève et on se barre by Virginie Despentes, published in the french daily newspaper Libération on the 1st of March 2020 (I want to tattoo every word of it on my forehead.)

Can you share some daily habits or rituals?
A sacred morning ritual: I have my Bulletproof coffee while 3elke, my cat, sips on some cold water in her yellow plate. I also wash my hands a zillion times a day, and that’s way before COVID.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
The light in April and October, when the city looks dipped in gold.

What is good design?
My cat’s coat.

Do you have a mantra during this time?
Brace yourself, embrace the collapse.

What is your favorite word?
Hayété. It means ‘you are my life’ in Lebanese arabic.

What do you wish to learn?
To be realistic and reasonable.

Where is happiness found?
In a giant bowl of taboulé.

What is outside your window?
A country giving birth to another one.

What is dear to your heart?
My nine hours of sleep.

What music or sound makes you nostalgic?
The creaking of a rusty swing on a mountain balcony, preferably in Lebanon. Fairuz singing Kifak Inta.

Who is an inspirational figure?
Each and every rebel carrying the Lebanese revolution on his/her shoulders since October 17th.

What is a powerful slogan?
Kellon Yaane Kellon (Everyone means everyone). It’s the main slogan of the Lebanese revolution that wants to take down the (whole) corrupt political mafia that has been ruling the country for the past 30 years, and shamelessly stealing our money.

What are you working on at the moment?
Apart from my writings for L’Orient-Le Jour, I’m working on a magazine out of Beirut. It’s supposed to launch as soon as this madness is behind us.

Any last words?
Do I get a Leorosa cardigan for replying to this questionnaire?
 


ADRIEN COTHIER wearing the Leo cardigan no.003. He is a filmmaker living in New York City.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Any music I can associate with a late 90s feel or an iconic cinematic memory. Everything But The Girl, Moby, Talk Talk, Lighthouse Family, Miles Davis, Vangelis... The Vanilla Sky O.S.T probably embodies that sentiment the most.

The best arthouse film?
Controversial films made for the sake of Art with no political agenda. La Grande Bouffe or Murmur of the Heart are great examples.

What was your last download?
Derek Cianfrance’s new HBO show “I know this much is true”. It’s pure melodrama at its finest.

If you were interviewing a fellow film director, what question would you ask them?
I would probably ask Steve McQueen what is the driving force behind his work. John Cassavetes said it was love. I’d be curious to know his.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Being a foreigner in New York is a precious burden. It forces you to be an eternal student of America’s enigmas.

Can you share some daily habits or rituals?
I’m terrible at this. During the quarantine I’ve barely mastered making decent filter coffee.

Who do you find to be an iconic person?
Gena Rowland, Sade and Susan Meiselas. Dare I say Dennis Rodman?

What is good design?
Something simple in both its beauty and usage. Like a minimalist poplin white shirt.

Where do you find good design?
Sweetu Patel who owns the store CHCM on Bond street has an incredible eclectic taste for well made, authentic clothing.

What do you still wish to learn?
Spanish guitar.

What should we be reading?
I’m a globalist at heart so I try to study and embrace thinkers from all sides of the political spectrum. I recommend Thomas Sowell, Zadie Smith, Reza Aslan, Coleman Hughes as a start. Not gonna lie, I loved reading David Mamet’s most controversial work to date, “The Secret Knowledge” on the dismantling of American Culture. He’s often full of shit but I needed to understand how he went from a being liberal hero to a fierce conservative advocate.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Creative originality, genuine tolerance and a sense of humor.

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
I struggle with this on a daily basis but I would not live in any other period.

What was the first piece of cultural work that really mattered to you?
Vivaldi’s four seasons made me start playing the violin. I quit after 8 tedious years.

What is the most enigmatic work you have seen?
Going to a midnight screening of Michael Mann’s HEAT at the Max Linder theater in Paris is arguably my best cinematic experience to date. It made me realize that this classic crime story was really a metaphor on the alienation of putting artistry in what you do.

What is still a mystery?
Hatred

Where is happiness found?
In the warm seat of a theater at an 11am screening, by myself.

What was the last thing you photographed?
A selfie I had to take for this brand called Leorosa. They make good jumpers!

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m the development stages of a documentary on the life of musician Darondo and adapting a book on the Crown Heights riots of 1991 by French writer Colombe Schneck.
 


Leorosa stands in solidarity with the Black community in the United States and globally. We support the protesters who demand justice on the systemic racism, oppression, and violence inflicted on black Americans every day.

American Civil Liberties Union
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The Bail Project
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Black Lives Matter
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Black Visions Collective
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Campaign Zero
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Color of Change
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Emergency Release Fund
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Equal Justice Initiative
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Grassroots Law Project
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The Legal Aid Society
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LGBTQ Freedom Fund
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The Marshall Project
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Minnesota Freedom Fund
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NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund
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National Association of Black Journalists
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National Bail Out
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Reclaim the Block
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Schomburg Center Black Liberation Reading List
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Southern Poverty Law Center
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EMMA McCORMICK-GOODHART wearing the Rosa cardigan no.004. She is an artist and writer living in New York City. Her sister, ANNA McCORMICK-GOODHARTis wearing the Maria pullover no.002. She is a researcher with the Arshile Gorky Foundation also living in New York City.

What should we be reading?
EMMA: Robert McFarlane’s Underland, a book of musings on subterranean spaces that reminds us of the vastness of geological timescales – and helps relativize our months of quarantine
ANNA: Italo Calvino's Cosmicomics – to set the mind spinning and Marina Warner’s Forms of Enchantment – for her seeing eye, the breadth and play of her associations, and the electricity of her prose.

What is your favorite word?
EMMA: The sound of Virginia Woolf incanting “incarnadine”
ANNA: Rhizomatic

What do you still wish to learn?
EMMA: To think less
ANNA: How to make a ship-in-a-bottle. It is still a mystery to me!

Is there a work of art that you feel a certain kinship with?
EMMA: Anicka Yi’s Biography perfume line, developed with perfumer Barnabé Fillion and launched at Dover Street Market, for its highly conceptual process, transhistorical currents, and deeply sensual scent-outcomes
ANNA: Roger Callois’ The Writing of Stones; Noguchi’s set designs for Martha Graham and Rauschenberg’s for Merce Cunningham; Joseph Cornell’s shadow boxes; Joan Jonas’ work; at the moment, Andrew Wyeth’s windows

What does progression mean to you?
EMMA: Flow, growth, and coalescence
ANNA: Continuum

What is your favourite representation of simplicity?
EMMA: A child’s drawing of a horizon

What is your favourite representation of complexity?
EMMA: A fishnet

What is good design?
EMMA: When it becomes invisible, or when it provokes (worthwhile) new behaviors
ANNA: The moon-viewing platform, old shoin, Katsura Villa, Kyoto, early Japanese scrolls - calligraphy

Where do you find good design?
EMMA: In a boat hull, and in Braille or tactile writing systems
ANNA: Always in nature

Can you define the words ‘timeless’ and ‘contemporary’?
EMMA: Why not as synonyms? The earliest cave paintings, for instance, are both hyper contemporary and timeless

What is the best cult classic?
EMMA: Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Red Desert” for its images of Monica Vitti dressed in mist from Northern Italian power stations
ANNA: Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant’s Charleston House in East Sussex

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
EMMA: In a late silent film (or early 1930s talkie)

Can you share some daily habits or rituals?
EMMA: I add a dash of pearl powder to my coffee every morning
ANNA: A strong coffee in the morning and, during these quieter weeks, reading in bed of an evening.

Do you have a mantra during this time?
EMMA: “In the woods, is perpetual youth.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Who do you find to be an iconic person?
EMMA: My mother, Stephanie, and my sister, Anna: they have always been my muses!

What does your house smell like?
EMMA: We’ve been isolating at our childhood home along the Patuxent River in Maryland, where thick sillages of honeysuckle waft in late. This meeting of land and salty, brackish water makes for ongoing aromatic conversation
ANNA: Wood smoke, even in summer

What does your house sound like?
EMMA: Like being aboard a boat, waves lapping against the shore
ANNA: Our family’s home in Maryland is very much a living house – it breathes throughout the day. As Emma says, the trees that surround us are “vocal” – with windows open, the rushes of wind and birdsong are amplified.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
EMMA: “The first food is air,” sayeth philosopher Luce Irigaray
ANNA: Instinct

What is a rule that should always be broken?
EMMA: The idea that it’s ever too late to change course, or that neutral tones necessarily bring clarity: paint your walls deep colors!

What is your perfect meal?
EMMA: Mermaid food: kelp noodles bathed in fresh lemon-mint-tahini pesto
ANNA: Our mother's Thanksgiving. Crisply roasted potatoes are ever-dependable, too.

What is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
EMMA: The loudness of social media that so often gets in the way of being in the world. Here’s to going info-vegan now and then!

What do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
EMMA: Speculative design proposals coming out of this moment: for face shields, wearable body cocoons, prosthetic door handle accessories to facilitate remote ‘touch’… new media that returns us to Space Age imaginaries

What do you collect?
EMMA: Books, shells, ephemera, and the occasional second hand Alaïa piece
ANNA: Books; shells; stones of all kinds; matchboxes; Emma’s, our mother’s, and our father’s creations …

The best arthouse film?
EMMA: Maya Deren’s “Meshes of the Afternoon,” or some of the first underwater films by John Ernest Williamson
ANNA: Sally Potter’s “Orlando” – for us both

What is the most enigmatic work you remember seeing?
EMMA: Composer-mystic Maryanne Amacher’s “Mini Sound Series,” a live performance-installation reinterpreted by the collective Supreme Connections at the Stedelijk Museum in 2017. Amacher was interested in psychoacoustic phenomena, where ears themselves emit audible sound, but this piece was as lushly visual and non-linear as it was sonic

What is still a mystery?
EMMA: That our senses work imperceptibly fast

Where is happiness found?
EMMA: In the surprise of synchronicity
ANNA: With presence in the moment

What was the last thing you photographed?
EMMA: The interior of an abalone shell
ANNA: Emma in her lambent orange Leorosa sweater, with a Japanese trumpet conch shell in hand

What do you see outside your window?
EMMA: Moss growing on old roof slate that slopes towards a river
ANNA: The Patuxent River - a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, where we are both sheltering. Sometimes, if I am lucky, a great blue heron rests on a piling in view; if the night is clear, the stars radiate

What is your favorite slogan?
EMMA: “Voices have legs”, “Make haste slowly”
ANNA: “there is nothing in the Understanding which was not before in the Sense” – Johann Comenius, The Visible World, “A line that incorporates oscillation and interruption is better able to survive as a continuous line” – Camille Henrot

What are you working on at the moment?
EMMA: An edition of conceptual face masks, called Particle Ethics, with embroidered language (on sale here — one design pictured on Anna); a perfume for a Boston Ballet commission in May 2021; an exhibition text to be printed on fabric for an upcoming show around James Joyce’s Ulysses at Belmacz (London); and an interview with artist-researcher Susan Schuppli for PIN-UP
 


Alma Zevi wearing the Polly cardigan no.002. She is a gallerist living in Venice, Italy.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Here in the mountains in Celerina, where I am isolating, it is a river that I try to jump into as often as possible. When in Venice it is Paolin, the coffee shop in Campo Santo Stefano perfectly situated between my house and my gallery - always the meeting place with friends.

Can you share some daily habits or rituals?
Every day I play with my son, annoy my husband, check in with my artists, video call with my gallery team (now spread out in 3 countries), and try to stay sane.

What is good design?
Charlap Hyman and Herrero. Everything they do (from buildings, to fabrics, to furniture) is exquisite, humorous and clever. We did a project together last year in Venice which was incredible - I am so lucky to work with them.

Where do you find good design?
Flea markets in Venice, Artek 2nd Cycle in Helsinki, Six Gallery in Milan.

What should we be reading?
I have just ordered ‘Girl, Woman, Other’ by Bernardine Evaristo. It should be a nice antidote to the Paddington Bear books I read incessantly to my son.

What does your house smell like?
Mountain flowers that we are not meant to pick.

What does progression mean to you?
Hopefully it could go hand in hand with learning from history?

Do you have a mantra during this time?
One day at a time.

What is a rule that should never be broken?
Mixing fish and cheese.

What is a rule that should always be broken?
Mixing things up - I love living with art and furniture from different periods and styles.

What is your perfect meal?
Harry’s Bar in Venice. Or meals cooked by artists - they usually make excellent chefs, and if not at least you know the company will be interesting!

What is your favorite word in any language?
Right now the word that sums up my mood is - "basta” - enough!

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Quiet and focus. Isolation makes a space for these things.

Who or what do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
The accessibility and democratisation it has allowed.

What do you collect?
I’ve collected contemporary art for the past ten years. It’s been fascinating watching the careers of artists flourish and evolve. I suppose I am working on two collections - one of the artists that I represent, and the other of artists who I just love!

The best arthouse film?
Bagdad Cafe directed by Percy Adlon; and Pane e Tulipani directed by Silvio Soldini and starring the unforgettable Bruno Ganz.

What was your last download?
I just downloaded Skype which was quite a blast from the past! It was to interview an artist who doesn’t have a cell phone and refuses to use zoom.

What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on forthcoming exhibitions for my Venice gallery by Katy Stubbs, Not Vital, Studio Mumbai and Luisa Lambri. Also a publication on Not Vital which will span 50 years of his work.

Any last words?
A mantra of the late, great Swiss artist Heidi Bucher (1926-1993), Räume sind Hüllen, sind Häute (Spaces are shells, are skins). This seems so fitting to what the world is going through. Her work is all about the connections between memory and spaces, whether physical or conceptual. It is an honour to represent the Heidi Bucher Estate and to have held exhibitions of her powerful and moving work.
 


David Ostrowski wearing the Gio gilet no.002. He is an artist living in Cologne, Germany.

What is good design?
Mies van der Rohe's Barcelona Pavilion, Marcel Breuer's Thonet Freischwinger and Christian Louboutin.

Where do you find good design?
I don’t joke around: at Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion.

Who are your ideal guests?
My family or Adam Sandler.

What do you collect?
Arthouse DVD films, which I will never watch. Otherwise I swap art with my colleagues.

Can you recommend an arthouse film?
C’était un rendez-vous by Claude Lelouch.

Can you share with us a fun game?
Connect 4, it’s the only game I have ever won.

What are you wearing?
I wear the same uniform everyday. A Cotton shirt and cotton pants in either navy or dark green.

Can you share some habits or rituals?
Washing my hands for 20 seconds as soon as I get home.

What is your perfect meal?
Jewish Penicillin (Chicken Soup).

What takes you to cloud 9?
I just bought the iCloud this year, so it will probably take a while for Cloud 9.

What is dear to your heart: person, place or thing?
At night watching TV in bed.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Every day my son and I go to the ‘Kap’ which is a skatepark on our street. We watch skaters being cool and I hope my son doesn’t break his bones.

What does your house smell like?
There’s a warm scent of love in the air, unless laundry or the dishes have not been taken care of.

What does your house sound like?
We live by the Rhine river and at home we listen to music around the clock - "Alle meine Entchen".

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Groundhog Day.

Do you have a mantra during this time?
Survive.

Who do you find an iconic person?
Adriano Celentano because he just got it.

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
In any Jewish quarter of this world.

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Good Art.

Who or what do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
Good Art.

What was your last download?
Insurance papers.

What do you reserve for Sundays?
Working in my studio.

What are you working on at the moment?
Trying to eat less sugar and meat.
 


Myung-Il Song wearing the Rosa cardigan no.002. She is a store owner living in Vienna, Austria. Her daughter, Song-I Saba wearing the Romy cardigan no.002 lives in London, England.

What flower best represents your mother?
SONG-I SABA: A bright pink peony

What flower best represents your daughter?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Lily of the Valley

What quote from your mother would you embroider onto a pillow?
MYUNG-IL SONG: It’s going to be OKAY.
SONG-I SABA: Are you hungry?

What are you wearing?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Paul Harnden flower print cotton pyjamas.
SONG-I SABA: My white house-Crocs were the best $30 I ever spent.

What do you collect?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Art and fashion by people who inspire me.
SONG-I SABA: Memories and mistakes. I also like miniatures.

What is good design?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Recently I am more excited to learn about pieces like furniture or textiles with no known designer, like a worker suit, carpenter’s pants, or photographer's jacket with three dimensional pockets. Designer Paul Harnden found a unique 18th century Windsor chair, made only once by basket maker, it’s not only beautiful but exceptionally comfortable.
SONG-I SABA: Leorosa is good design.

Where do you find good design?
SONG-I SABA: At my mother’s home.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
MYUNG-IL SONG: I love the Lessing statue near my apartment in Vienna.
SONG-I SABA: Hampstead Heath in London is a revelation every time.

What is your perfect meal?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Any meal cooked with love.
SONG-I SABA: One shared with my boyfriend and our friends, and an increasingly rowdy one.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Beethoven's 5th

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Good manners.
SONG-I SABA: A phone charger at a house party.

What are you working on at the moment?
MYUNG-IL SONG: My book, and dreaming up my next challenge.
SONG-I SABA: On myself... A real fixer upper

Can you recommend an Arthouse film?
MYUNG-IL SONG: 1984 (BBC production, 1954). That story is very contemporary and apt
SONG-I SABA: ‘A Pervert’s Guide to Cinema / Ideology’ directed by Sophie Fiennes

Can you share some habits or rituals?
SONG-I SABA: Coffee and a book in bed first thing.

Who are your ideal guests?
MYUNG-IL SONG: People with a good sense of humour.
SONG-I SABA: Anyone who doesn’t ask you what you “do"

What does your house smell like?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Palisander wood

What does your house sound like?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Church bells
SONG-I SABA: Our neighbour’s questionable taste in music

Can you share with us a fun game?
SONG-I SABA: Does Chatroulette count?

Do you have a mantra during this time?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Do things wholeheartedly, otherwise what’s the point?
SONG-I SABA: WASH YOUR HANDS

Who do you find an iconic person?
SONG-I SABA: Jackie Chan is my icon and hands down the cutest person alive today

What takes you to cloud 9?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Eating fresh, cold watermelon
SONG-I SABA: Fireworks

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
SONG-I SABA: Wherever she is, tell her to stay the hell over there

What do you reserve for Sundays?
MYUNG-IL SONG: Staying in bed
SONG-I SABA: Absolutely nothing! I believe in total equality for all days of the week, which is pretty woke of me

What is dear to your heart: person, place or thing?
MYUNG-IL SONG: My daughter
SONG-I SABA: Revenge
 


Rebecca Fourteau wearing the Polly cardigan no.003. She is a director living in New York City.

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
At the rodeo, I’d hope!

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Walking everywhere, from one neighborhood to the next. The variety of lives crammed together on top of one another and the energy it produces. The sense of humanity emanating from the cracks in the sidewalks, to the top of the tallest roofs.

What is your most indispensable household item?
A wooden spoon for stirring stews.

Do you have a mantra during this time?
Carpe Diem! and a daily reminder that the end is nigh.

What should we be reading?
I'm reading Marie Antoinette's biography by Stefan Zweig as a way of escaping life in my apartment and to think about how things can be a lot better, and a lot worse.

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m working on a little film about the effects of confinement and isolation on everyday life in NYC.

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Honor and life lasting quality.

Who or what do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
The increasing democratization of distribution.

The best Anti-showbiz film?
‘Revanche’ directed by Götz Spielmann, ‘A Woman Under the Influence’ directed by John Cassavetes, ‘L’Humanité’ directed by Bruno Dumont, ‘Wanda’ directed by Barbara Loden etc …

Can you share some habits or rituals?
I journal in the morning and read before bed.

What is your perfect meal?
Homemade spaghetti bolognese

What do you collect?
I collect souvenir magnets for my fridge and souvenir mugs - I even have some from places I’ve never been. I also collect orchids that people receive as gifts and throw out when their flowers fall off, for my orchid rehab center. I take them in and resuscitate them. I’m thrilled to report that they are all currently blooming!

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Radio in the mornings and for chores, the rest of the time I spend seeking silence amidst the noisy New York life outside my porous window.

Who are your ideal guests?
Those who like to laugh a lot.

Who is a storybook character you still love?
I still love The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. It was such an important book for me growing up. I love that the little Prince illustrates the importance of questioning everything "grownups" say and shows the intelligence of imagination and the unique value of empirical knowledge. Those are all values that I still hold as fundamental.I still love The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. It was such an important book for me growing up. I love that the little Prince illustrates the importance of questioning everything "grownups" say and shows the intelligence of imagination and the unique value of empirical knowledge. Those are all values that I still hold as fundamental.

What is dear to your heart?
Freedom.

Your favorite expression?
"Vague à l'âme" which translates directly to "waves to the soul" and means something melancholy or sorrow.

What are you wearing?
Right now, I’m wearing cotton leggings and an oversized button down. Soon I will pull over some jeans to go outside.I love colors and patterns and mostly wear vintage and thrift clothes. Occasionally I’ll buy something new and nice, but I try to be very careful about the way I consume clothing, and everything else!
 


Curtis Leslie Anderson wearing the Leo cardigan no.001. He is an artist living in Potsdam, Germany.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
Here in Potsdam, I cherish the paths taking one through the Lenné designed garden linking the Sacrower Schloss to the Heilandskirche, which lies on the shore of the Havel River, although for a boy from the Pacific Northwest this river resembles a swamp. Still a very picturesque site for walks with my partner and our two Rehpinscher dogs, Eri + Bambi.

Who do you find an iconic person ?
Ad Reinhardt has probably influenced me as an artist more than anyone else. So diverse and consequent in his many languages. And like myself looking to Asia for a certain sense of resolution.

What takes you to cloud 9?
When I turned 50 in 2006 I made plans to spend six weeks in Arizona earning my glider pilot license. My partner didn’t approve and expressed herself as follows, “Go ahead, but don’t come back. I don’t want to live with a pilot!” So I’m afraid that I’ll be viewing the clouds from below, including number 9.

What do you collect?
I collect friends above all. Then come books. And then artworks – but limited to works on paper, photographs and objects. No canvases. I’m not a fan of Joseph Kosuth but he did get one thing right – “Canvas is very useful – for making tents!”

What is your most indispensable household item?
My most indispensible household item is without question my Gaggenau steam oven. It offers a gentle and fat free method of cooking – up to four dishes simultaneously. And steam – a vaporized form of water – which I would most like to be. To gently enter the tissue of other beings.

What does your house smell like?
I often use the L'Occitane room scent called ‘Rameau d’Hiver’ and imagine that I still live in an area defined by virgin conifer forests.

What does your house sound like?
My house has no characteristic sound. My life is more like a jukebox with an ever changing soundtrack.

What are you wearing?
My daily uniform consists of pants from Arc’teryx, the great outdoor outfitter from British Columbia, near to my hometown of Seattle. I wear t-shirts from Calida, the Swiss firm, from their MicroModal product line. Round these off with compression stockings – which protect me from thrombose and keep my aged ankles trim. I have a wide variety of fleece jackets and shells, almost all from Arc’teryx. The logo of this firm originated with a fossil example of the flying dinosaur which resides in the Humboldt University in Berlin. In the meantime the Chinese have found a larger example, of course. On cold days I like to wrap a large and heavy wool coat from Christophe Lemaire around me.

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
I pity even the idea that someone might be my Doppelgänger.

What do you reserve for Sundays?
I enjoy sharing lunch, not dinner, with friends on Sundays.

What was your last download?
What is a download?

Can you share some habits or rituals?
When I left the US of A for good in 1985 I decided to celebrate my distant friends with birthday greetings once a year. Since then I collect birthdays and in our age of telecommunications write emails. Often with oversized and colorful typography and photos attached. I try to never miss a day although I don’t write to everyone every year – and subscribe to the behavioral psychology principal of indeterminate reinforcement.

What is dear to your heart: person, place or thing?
This remains my secret.

What is your mantra?
I recently lost my father. In my eulogy I announced that I would in the future have to recite the Lord’s Prayer in two alternating versions, like a mantra: “Our father who art in heaven” and “My father who art in heaven.”

Can you share with us a fun game?
I have no fun with games. I have had a lifelong aversion to confinement and rules. My dear friend Ketuta Alex-Meskhishvili once wrote, “You are an oasis of freedom in a world full of rules!” I have no enthusiasm for anything involving a ball. My introduction to European football: The very day of my move from New York to Cologne in May of 1985, with my flight taking me to Bruxelles, I sat with two friends in a private automobile on the way to JFK Airport. On the radio we heard the news about dozens of people being trampled to death in a Bruxelles soccer stadium. I thought at that moment, “Fuck me! I thought that I’m moving to Europe because it’s MORE civilized!” I prefer pure and simple movement out of doors - bicycling, rock and mountain climbing, cross-country skiing and Nordic walking.

What is good design?
Hans Wegner is for me the greatest furniture designer of the 20th Century. I live with an abundant number of his ‘Wishbone’ chairs in soaped oak. One never tires of sitting in these. And then the grand ‘Ox’ chair in which one can assume numerous positions. He himself lived with six of these, the female and male versions, in a circular arrangement in his own living room – which brings us back to the number six for an agreeable gathering of persons.

Where do you find good design?
I hope to find good design at the tips of my fingers, whether of my own creation or something which I’ve just had the pleasure of stroking.

What are you working on at the moment?
I’m still struggling to free myself from the tyranny of known and named objects in the world.

The best Anti-showbiz film?
I find it impossible to remove showbiz from the commercial film world. I really enjoyed watching my friend Cyprien Gaillard’s 3D film ‘Nightlife’ at the Sprüth Magers Galerie in Berlin a few years ago. I also work with film in a plastic way, making video and film installations and more recently transportable silk / video works, one meter square and of sewn silk based on the ‘black paintings’ of Ad Reinhardt with round video images cast into the fabric from behind. My favorite verbal sparring partner in the world, the now 90-year-old Mario Diacono, reacted to my first series of such works as follows: “You have launched Ad Reinhardt into outer space! And he has been reborn as Innerspace Curtis. You have made the painting to end all paintings into a transition toward the post-painting, the video, but at the same time you let them co-exist, as if you were refusing to choose between the past and the future.”

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
Exquisite extemporaneous speech.

Who or what do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
This remains my secret.

Who are your ideal guests?
At home I never have more than six people at my table, the ideal number for a single conversation and not a group splintering into numerous simultaneous conversations. Anyone who is verbally fit and has something to share is welcome at my table.

Can you draw something for us?
I don’t draw on commission.
 


Brunhilde Bordeaux-Groult wearing the Rosa cardigan no.006.
She is an artist who lives in Bornheim, Germany.


What is your most indispensable household item?
A broom to sweep the mind of unnecessary dust thoughts.

What do you treasure most in your neighborhood or city?
The gravel pit down in the woods.

Can you share some habits or rituals?
Hot water, apple vinegar, lemon in the morning and a gentle conscious breathing.

What is your perfect meal?
Depends on the seasons & the hour of the day of course.

Who are your ideal guests?
Witty but also polite.

Who do you find an iconic person?
Scarlett O’Hara and all the anachorètes throughout time.

What do you collect?
I collect the presence of beauty of different kinds and in no particular form...

What does your house smell like?
Opoponax from Diptyque which reminds me of walking down my childhood corridor to my father‘s office. Also Sage & other magic helpers too.

What does your house sound like?
Podcasts of all kinds mixed with bird songs & agriculture machinery.

Do you have a soundtrack to your life?
Life is my track. My heart is the sound.

Do you have a mantra during this time?
“May the importance lie in your gaze, not in the object of your observation“ “Que l'importance soit dans ton regard, non dans la chose regardée.” Les Nourritures terrestres (1897) de André Gide.

The best Anti-showbiz film?
Oh films, so many beautiful ones..... Sayat Nova’s ‘The Color of Pomegranates’ directed by Sergei Parajanov, ‘Meetings with Remarkable Men’ directed by Peter Brook, ’Le Quattro Volte’ directed by Michelangelo Frammartino, and ‘Les Contes de l'horloge magique’ directed by Ladislas Starewitch.

What is good design?
Good design for me is when design grounds itself within the sensitive coherence of nature - whether violent or hard.

Where do you find good design?
No specific place to find good design but definitely harder these days.

Where do you imagine you would find your doppelgänger?
Where I don’t know but hope not to find too soon because this will mean ... My End !... Curse of the self in the doppelgänger.

What takes you to cloud 9?
When I'm truly in the present moment.

What is dear to your heart: person, place or thing?
My loved ones.

Who or what is most difficult to find in contemporary culture?
The lack of elegance of the heart.

Who or what do you find most exciting in contemporary culture?
All the self initiatives which rise around the world.

What was your last download?
Right now as I’m downloading myself to answer these questions.

What are you working on at the moment?
The garden and the perfect tuning if that exists.

Any last words?
Last words to William Morris “Have nothing in your house that you don't know to be useful or believe to be beautiful“.
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